In their own words

Stories from patients with early-stage prostate cancer

Effective August 2, 2022, mdxhealth has acquired the Oncotype DX Genomic Prostate Score (GPS) test from Exact Sciences. Additionally, Exact Sciences will continue to perform the GPS test during the transition. For more details, please review the press release.
Questions? Email: gps@mdxhealth.com

“I was relieved when genomic testing confirmed that my prostate cancer was slow growing."

Is Your Prostate Cancer Low-Risk?

Jim and his doctor used Oncotype DX® to help decide with confidence if he could delay or avoid immediate aggressive treatment like surgery.

Lloyd and His Wife Discuss Prostate Cancer Treatments and Active Surveillance

When it comes to prostate cancer, communication is vital, not only with a patient's doctor, but with their partner as well. We join Lloyd and his wife as they, with the help of Dr. Ketan Badani, learn that surgery and radiation are not the only treatment options.

  • Jim's Story
  • Lloyd's Story
“My doctor came to me and said, “We would like to do a genomic test, and we already have the tissue from the biopsy.”…To have all of the knowledge that I have about the disease, about my particular type of cancer. It's giving me the opportunity to do a lot of the things that I would like to do in life.”

Jim, a former sales executive, was enjoying retirement when in 2014, he decided to find out why his PSA, which had been rising slowly, suddenly made several big jumps. His doctor recommended a prostate biopsy which revealed that Jim had prostate cancer, although it appeared to be slow growing according to traditional measures. Jim’s Gleason score was 3+3, indicating that it was low-grade and less likely to spread.

To get a clearer picture of the aggressiveness of Jim’s cancer, his doctor recommended the Oncotype DX Genomic Prostate Score (GPS) test. Jim was relieved when he received a low GPS result of 10. He felt comfortable choosing a program of active surveillance rather than immediate surgery or radiation—treatments that can often have life-changing side effects such as incontinence and impotence.

“I was relieved when genomic testing confirmed that my prostate cancer was slow growing."

“I realized that it would be premature to pursue any aggressive treatment at that point,” says Jim. Six years later, Jim is secure in the knowledge that regular monitoring will alert him to any change in his condition. “I was relieved when genomic testing confirmed that my prostate cancer was slow growing. I would advise everyone to get all the information you can before you make a decision about your life and your body.” In the meantime, he is loving his life in Phoenix, Arizona, where he enjoys golf, photography, and spending time with his wife, children, and grandchildren.

“Genomic testing determined that my early-stage cancer was not aggressive, meaning that I could choose active surveillance instead of invasive treatment.”

When Lloyd, a financial executive, was diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer in his mid-fifties, he was inclined to do whatever was recommended to treat his cancer. After further research, however, he learned that most early-stage disease is not aggressive and may not need immediate treatment.

“Like many men, my first reaction to my diagnosis was fear. I was ready for radiation or surgical treatment, but the likely side effects of treatment—sexual and urinary dysfunction—led my wife, Joan, and me to seek more information.”

Lloyd began his search for more information about his treatment options. He asked for a second opinion, and the urologist he spoke with mentioned that the Oncotype DX Genomic Prostate Score (GPS) test could help him better understand the biological behavior of his cancer. When Lloyd received a low Oncotype DX GPS result, he knew he would not need immediate aggressive treatment. “Genomic testing determined that my early-stage cancer was not aggressive, meaning that I could choose active surveillance instead of invasive treatment,” said Lloyd. His active surveillance treatment plan consisted of regular check-ups and testing to monitor and ensure his cancer was not progressing.

A few years later, as part of Lloyd’s regular testing schedule, his PSA and a biopsy indicated that he needed surgery. “I am still very happy I chose my treatment path as I did, and I was able to delay surgery for almost 6 years. I put my trust in the Oncotype test and the science behind it, and it gave me and my doctors a clearer understanding of what the cancer might be doing.”

Learn how the GPS test helps individualize your treatment

What you can expect from the GPS test results

In their own words: Stories from patients with early-stage prostate cancer

See FAQs and videos about the GPS test

89%
of GPS test patients have $0 financial responsibility

This calculation includes patients with Medicare, Medicare Advantage, Medicaid, Managed Medicaid, and commercial insurance. Your cost-sharing amounts, including deductibles and copays, will vary by plan and coverage type. Only your insurer can confirm if and how the GPS test will be covered.

94%
of GPS test patients have a financial responsibility of <$100

This calculation includes patients with Medicare, Medicare Advantage, Medicaid, Managed Medicaid, and commercial insurance. Patients with high-deductible plans may receive a bill for most or all of the cost of the GPS test if they have not satisfied their deductible.


Learn about costs, coverage, and how Exact Sciences can help

 

 

*Testing performed at an Exact Sciences clinical lab in Redwood City, CA (Genomic Health, Inc.).

†The numbers cited are based on historical patient billing data from 1/02/2021 to 12/31/2021. Rates of coverage vary by state and region. Exceptions for coverage may apply. Exact Sciences strongly encourages patients to contact their insurer with questions about the GPS test coverage.